Diagnosis

In the past a diagnosis for Eosinophilic Disease was only possible thorugh two invasive procedures to determine the number of Eosinophils present, these were:

Colonoscopy:

A colonoscopy is a test where an operator (a doctor or nurse) looks into your colon. The colon is sometimes called the large intestine or large bowel. The colon is the part of the gut which comes after the small intestine. The last part of the colon leads into the rectum where faeces (stools or motions) are stored before being passed out from the anus.

A colonoscope is a thin, flexible, telescope. It is about as thick as a little finger. It is passed through the anus and into the colon. It can be pushed all the way round the colon as far as the caecum (where the small and large intestine meet).

Endoscopy (also known as Gastroscopy)

A gastroscopy is a test where an operator (a doctor or nurse) looks into the upper part of your gut (the upper gastrointestinal tract). The upper gut consists of the oesophagus (gullet), stomach and duodenum. The operator uses an endoscope to look inside your gut. Therefore, the test is sometimes called endoscopy.

An endoscope is a thin, flexible, telescope. It is about as thick as a little finger. The endoscope is passed through the mouth, into the oesophagus and down towards the stomach and duodenum.

The tip of the endoscope contains a light and a tiny video camera so the operator can see inside your gut.

More frequently, patients are being given a predictive diagnosis prior to confirmation using these methods.